Reservations



Reservations



Passengers Loading the Steamship

Passengers loading onto the Mount Washington at Weirs Beach. Behind the Mount, the Governor Endicott steamer approaches the wharf. (For a great full-size postcard of the Governor Endicott, scroll to the bottom of this page.) The Weirs Cafe sported a sign for the Ice Cream Parlor operated by George E. Armstrong.

Below, a colorized postcard, based on a photo that seems to have been taken just a few minutes before the above postcard.

A very similar b&w photo to the above colorized postcards.

 

Passengers loading onto the Mount Washington at Weirs Beach. The Hotel Weirs Wharf can be seen to the left.

 

A nearly identical b&w photo to the above colorized postcard, give or take a few minutes difference.

 

“Passenger Landing from Steamer Mt. Washington at the Wiers, Lake Winnipesaukee, N.H.”

 

A few years later, passengers are again seen loading onto the Mount Washington at Weirs Beach. The Winnipesaukee Pier can be seen to the left.

 

Passengers loading the Mount Washington in Wolfeboro.

 

Passengers unloading the Mount Washington in Alton Bay.

 

Passengers loading the Mount Washington in Centre Harbor.

 

Passengers loading the Mount Washington at Bear Island.

 

Passengers on deck of the Mount Washington as the Mount approaches Center Harbor. Red Hill can be seen in the distance

 

Fully loaded, the steamer is about to pull up to its wharf at Weirs Beach

 

Same picture as the above colorized postcard, but the b&w photo has so much more detail.

 

Once again, passengers are seen loading the steamship

 

Her duty done for the day, the Mount sits idly at her home wharf in Weirs Beach, empty of passengers. This great postcard shows clearly that the steamstack was indeed, two separate pipes, one small, one large. We can also see clearly under the semi-circular paddlewheel box the paddles that were the steamship’s means of propulsion. The paddlewheel box protected the wheel from damage and shielded passengers from the turning wheel and from the water thrown up by its blades. At the center of the box was an 8′ wide decorative carving of the sun rising over the real Mount Washington, New England’s highest peak. Known as a lunette, the carving seen here on the starboard side of the steamer was saved from the ruins of the steamer when she burned at her moorings in December of 1939 and now resides at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, CT. The port side of the steamer sported a similar lunette, except instead of rising, the sun was seen setting over Mount Washington. Unfortunately the port lunette was destroyed in the 1939 fire.

 

The steamer Governor Endicott shared the wharf with the Mount Washington.